Tag Archives: secondhand smoke

4 Things You Might Not Know About Kids’ Oral Health

 

Some interesting facts as we wind down National Children’s Dental Health Month:

  1. Oral health affects how kids do in school.
    According to research published in the American Journal of Public Health, children with poor oral health are three times more likely to miss school because of dental pain and do tend worse academically. Missing class isn’t the issue. Kids who skip school to get routine preventive care show no drop in academic performance.
  2. Bacteria that cause tooth decay can colonize before the teeth come in.
    Earlier this year, scientists using DNA sequencing identified hundreds of bacterial species in the saliva of infants. These included S. mutans, which plays a very big role in the development of early childhood caries (EEC). Such findings underscore the need to begin oral hygiene early and take your child for their first dental visit shortly after their first tooth erupts or around their first birthday.
  3. Teething gels that contain benzocaine can be a problem.
    Benzocaine is a pain-killer commonly found in products such as Orajel, and the FDA recommends against it for teething infants. Why? Such gels raise the risk of methemoglobinemia, or “blue baby syndrome” – a blood disorder that keeps oxygen from getting to the body’s cells. Let your child use teething rings instead, or gently massage their gums with your finger.
  4. Secondhand smoke can damage children’s teeth and gums.
    Studies have found that children regularly exposed to secondhand smoke have more cavities, worse periodontal health and factors that exacerbate both problems: reduced salivary flow, more acidic saliva and higher levels of pathogenic bacteria.

Image by CarbonNYC, via Flickr

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Secondhand Smoke Hurts Kids’ Teeth & Gums

When we think about the health effects of smoking, the first things that come to mind are usually diseases such as cancer and emphysema. But smoking does a number on a person’s dental health, too – and far beyond simple bad breath and stained teeth. For instance, smokers are four times more likely than non-smokers to develop periodontal disease, even if their home hygiene is exemplary. Gum health deteriorates, often leading to bone and tooth loss. Some periodontists – dentists who specialize in treating the gums – refuse reparative treatments to smokers if they continue to use, such is the ongoing damage.

More than half of all cases of periodontal disease can be attributed to smoking.

 

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If you smoke, you might think, “Fine, but it’s my body. I can do what I want to it,” and that’s certainly your choice – though I would argue it’s far from the best you can make. But you’re not the only one exposed to the toxins in cigarette smoke. Just as secondhand smoke can cause cancer, emphysema and other diseases in non-smokers, so can it cause dental problems for a very vulnerable population: young children.

Two studies published over the past couple years have demonstrated that “passive smoking” (exposure to secondhand smoke) considerably raises young people’s risk of dental problems. The first, published in 2008 in the Archives of Oral Biology showed quite plainly that children exposed to cigarette smoke had more caries (cavities). They also showed higher counts of pathogenic oral bacteria, more acidic saliva and a lower rate of salivary flow – all factors contributing to the formation of caries.

The second study, published earlier this year in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology, found that children exposed to cigarette smoke also show deterioration of their gum tissues. Here, the researchers measured levels of continine – a primary metabolite of nicotine – in the children’s saliva, urine and gingival crevicular fluid (found in the small space between each tooth and the surrounding gum tissue), as well as conducted periodontal exams. Those children with higher continine levels showed lower clinical attachment levels (the attachment of gum tissues to the alveolar bone and tooth structure) – a marker of gum disease. Though it’s not clear why, this effect was more pronounced in children whose fathers smoked compared to those whose mothers smoked.

The moral of the story? If you choose to continue to smoke, avoid doing so around others, especially children. But best of all – for kids’ health as well as your own – is to quit tobacco use altogether. For those of you ready to take that step, here are some resources from the CDC and info on a few natural remedies to help you get started stopping.

 

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