Tag Archives: gum disease

Gum Disease & ED

Find any list of qualities to cultivate for sex appeal, and you’ll find it includes an attractive smile. People consistently rate it as the most captivating physical feature – more than eyes, hair or even physique.

smileJust because a smile looks good, however, doesn’t necessarily mean it’s healthy. And according to a new study, a particular kind of unhealthy one could be putting a damper on your sex life.

For a while now, we’ve known about the links between periodontal disease and inflammatory conditions such as heart disease, diabetes and stroke. All those are known to be physical causes of erectile dysfunction, and there appears to be a relationship between ED and gum disease, as well.

According to Wiley’s press release on research just published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine,

Turkish researchers compared 80 men aged 30 to 40 with erectile dysfunction with a control group of 82 men without erection problems.

This showed that 53 per cent of the men with erectile dysfunction had inflamed gums compared with 23 per cent in the control group.

When the results were adjusted for other factors, such as age, body mass index, household income and education level, the men with severe periodontal disease were 3.29 times more likely to suffer from erection problems than men with healthy gums.

Smokers, older men and those with systemic illness were excluded from the study, as all are already at elevated risk for both ED and periodontal disease.

As ever, correlation doesn’t equal causation; it only shows that two things occur together. It’s where things stand with the gum disease/heart disease link, as well. We know that they’re often present together; that oral bacteria are often found in the heart; that improving gum health may improve heart health. If you’ve been diagnosed with one condition, it’s worthwhile to get the other checked and do what you can to improve your health.

The good news with gum disease is that, unless severe or advanced, it’s usually reversible through a combination of improved home care and diet, frequent professional cleanings and sometimes surgery. Granted, it takes a time and money, but it’s certainly cheaper than replacing the teeth you’re sure to lose if gum disease goes unchecked.

Consider the results of a study published earlier this year in the Journal of Periodontology. Its authors found that those who had only baseline treatment could replace just 3 teeth with bridgework – or 2 with implants – before they’d be spending more than for a lifetime of perio care.

Those who had no treatment at all could buy 4.

Image by practicalowl, via Flickr

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Why Exercise?

Exercise might be one of the most overlooked factors in dental health. While most people are at least aware that physical activity is part of being healthy, far fewer know that it helps their teeth and gums, too.

For instance, as we noted before, research shows that those who exercise have a much lower risk of periodontitis (gum disease) than those who don’t, especially former smokers. (For most, smoking pretty much guarantees gum disease and tooth loss.)

Physical activity also helps your body better assimilate nutrients like calcium, a crucial mineral for the remineralization of teeth.

Here are 5 more “hidden” benefits, courtesy of integrative physician Dr. Eudene Harry, author of Live Younger in 8 Simple Steps:

  1. Younger looking, more blemish-free skin
    The increase in circulation and perspiration that occurs with exercise delivers more nutrients to your skin while allowing impurities and waste to be removed. The result? A healthier complexion!
  2. Natural “feel-good” chemicals
    Exercise releases endorphins, the brain chemicals that boost your mood and make you feel happy, as well as relieve stress, and enhance your self-esteem and self-confidence. Exercise has also been shown to increase neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine, which gives us a natural high and allows us to sleep better.
  3. Constipation prevention
    Exercise increases the contractions of the wall of the intestine, helping to move things along through the intestinal tract more easily, and decreasing the time it takes to pass through the large intestine. But wait an hour or two after eating before exerting yourself: Exercising too soon after a meal can divert blood flow away from the gut and toward the muscles, weakening peristaltic contractions (and slowing down the digestion process).
  4. Prevents brittle bones
    Walking, jogging, dancing, weight training and yoga are all weight-bearing exercises that help strengthen bones. Swimming and bicycling are exercises that are considered non-weight bearing. During weight-bearing exercises, bones adapt to the impact of the weight and the pull of muscles by building more bone cells, increasing strength and density and decreasing the risk of fractures, osteopenia and osteoporosis.
  5. Enhanced immunity
    Physical exertion increases the rate at which antibodies flow through the blood stream, resulting in better immunity against sickness. The increased temperature generated during moderate exercise makes it difficult for certain infectious organisms to survive.

40 more reasons to exercise

We hope you and yours have a joyful Thanksgiving – a wonderful start to your holiday season ! We’ll be back to our regular posting here on November 30.

Image by bookgrl, via Flickr

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Fighting Gum Disease with Food

We’ve long known that periodontal (gum) disease is a major problem here in the US, but now a study just published in the Journal of Dental Research puts it into numbers.

And they’re not pretty.

One of every two adults over 30 has some form of gum disease.

Among seniors, it’s about 7 in 10.

Rates are highest for Mexican-Americans, current smokers, those living below the federal poverty line and those with less than a high school education. And more men are affected by it than women (56.4% vs. 38.4%).

According to Dr. Bicuspid’s summary, this data came from the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), which for the first time included a full mouth perio exam. Before, only partial mouth exams were done. But “because periodontal disease is not evenly distributed in the mouth, prevalence estimates from surveys…may have underestimated the severity of the disease.”

Consequently, the new findings are considered the most accurate to date.

Of course, one of the things that makes such numbers so troubling is that gum disease, like tooth decay, is almost entirely preventable. Good oral hygiene, of course, is part of it. So is good nutrition. Not only can it help lower your risk; it can help manage or reverse the course of perio disease if it does occur.

Because it inovlves inflammation – a major factor in its link with heart disease, stroke, diabetes and other conditions – a good, broad and basic approach to getting the best of perio problems can be an anti-inflammatory diet such as this one from Dr. Weil.

And there are specific nutrients that offer great help, as well.

For instance, one study published about a year ago in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology confirmed the significant impact of vitamin D, calcium and antioxidants on gum health. Reviewing “the evidence for nutritional exposures in the etiology and therapeutic management of periodontitis” – that is, the cause and treatment of advanced gum disease – the authors concluded that

For prevention and treatment of periodontitis daily nutrition should include sufficient antioxidants, vitamin D, and calcium. Inadequate antioxidant levels may be managed by higher intake of vegetables, berries, and fruits (e.g. kiwi fruit), or by phytonutrient supplementation.

But while supplementation can help, whole, natural foods should be your first and best source of all essential nutrients (along with, in the case of Vitamin D, sunshine). Here are a couple of references to help you make your “perio happy” shopping list:

Image by Dr Parveen Chopra, via Flickr

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HPV, Oral Cancer & Gum Disease

According to the CDC, more than 36,500 new cases of mouth and throat cancer are diagnosed every year. The 5 year survival rate is only about 50%.

But that rate is a whole lot better in cases where the cancer is detected early. That’s why, in my office, oral cancer screening – using VelScope – is included in every adult patient’s exam at least once a year.

A recent paper underscores why this matters.

Published last month in Head & Neck Oncology, the study confirms that

oral sex with multiple partners is one of the significant risk factors for oral cancer and oropharyngeal cancer. Young people, who increasingly practice oral sex especially with many partners, may be driving the increase in these cancers.

The culprit, as we’ve discussed before, is HPV (human papillomavirus). More known for causing cervical cancer, HPV is also a major cause of oral cancer. In fact, it’s surpassed tobacco as the leading risk factor: While smoking rates have plummetted, oral cancer rates have soared. And that risk increases along with sexual activity. According to the current research,

HPV infection is likely to be sexually acquired with increased risk of oropharyngeal cancer with either many (more than 26) lifetime vaginal-sex partners or six or more lifetime oral-sex partners.

Why is the mouth so vulnerable to HPV transmission?

It must be remembered that the oral cavity is a battlefield of healing mucosal micro abrasions which could in the right circumstances of altered local host defenses allow viral inculcation, infection and entrenchment leading to somatic genetic change. Changes in immuno-tolerance at these “special” immuno-modulating sites…combined with further environmental triggers then lead to cancerous changes. Basically, viral “genes load the gun and environment pulls the trigger.”

So maybe it’s no surprise that earlier research has suggested a connection between gum disease and oral cancer. The initial study found that precancerous lesions were twice as prevalent – and tumors, four times as prevalent – in those with periodontal disease than those with healthy gums. Inflammation appears to be the key factor, as lead author Dr. Mine Tezal recently discussed in an interview with Dr. Bicuspid about her ongoing research:

The results of our recent study suggested an association between chronic local inflammation and tumor HPV status of head and neck cancers. HPV infects only basal cells of the epithelium and gains access through breaks in the mucosa….

In this inflammatory environment, HPV is also shed in greater amounts leading to increased risk of viral transmission. If prospective studies in cancer-free populations confirm that chronic inflammation is a significant factor in the natural history of oral HPV infection, the public health implications would be important.

Thus, another cancer-preventive measure, she suggests, is to control inflammation in the mouth. And she likewise confirms what the Head & Neck Oconology paper showed: frequency of exposure to the virus matters. A lot.

HPV is a commonly transmitted virus and the majority of the infections are cleared rapidly by the immune system without causing disease. Rather than the mere presence of the virus at one time point, its persistence is critical for the development of HPV-related diseases. [emphasis added]

Learn more steps you can take to lower your risk of oral cancer from my earlier post “The Oral Cancer Pandemic & How You Can Keep Yourself Safe.”

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Raspberries, Piercings & Smoking – Oh, My!

So back to blogging, following up on a few older posts with more recent items I ran across during the hiatus…

Nontoxic Oral Cancer Treatments

We’ve looked at causes and early detection of oral cancer, but then what? Well, if a pair of recent studies holds up, we just might wind up treating precancerous lesions with raspberries.

“Part of the biggest clinical challenge,” says Dr. Susan Mallery in DrBicuspid’s report on her work, “is that we cannot currently identify which lesions will progress to oral cancer. Having nontoxic and effective treatment options available would be a great benefit to both patients and healthcare practitioners.”

In a 2010 study in Pharmaceutical Research, Dr. Mallery’s team found that applying a black raspberry gel directly to the lesions kept precancerous cells from becoming cancerous.

Based on the known mechanisms by which berry compounds function at the cellular levels, researchers speculate that the promising gel trial results reflect activation of two related pathways – apoptosis and terminal differentiation – in the premalignant cells. The ultimate benefit is that damaged cells don’t continue to divide and are therefore not retained.

A new study by the team, published in Molecular Pharmaceutics, showed similar efficacy of patch-delivered fenretinide, a synthetic vitamin A compound. The authors suggest that these “chemopreventives” could be used alone or in rotation, though the raspberry gel was enough for many.

“We’re getting a pretty good handle on what enzymes you need and how you metabolize the compounds, which will give a predictive indicator if you’re going to be a good responder to the raspberry gel alone,” Dr. Mallery said.

How Body Piercing Can Go Wrong

A while back, we looked at a few of the problems oral piercings can cause for your teeth and gums – from infection to pushing teeth out of alignment. But there are others.

Last month, the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology published a comprehensive review of “the medical consequences of body piercing.” First, there are those that can crop up regardless of where the piercing is.

Localized infections are common. Systemic infections such as viral hepatitis and toxic shock syndrome and distant infections such as endocarditis and brain abscesses have been reported. Other general complications include allergic contact dermatitis (e.g. from nickel or latex), bleeding, scarring and keloid formation, nerve damage, and interference with medical procedures such as intubation and blood/organ donation.

Then there are “site-specific” problems. Of concern to dentists:

Oral piercings may lead to difficulty speaking and eating, excessive salivation, and dental problems. Oral and nasal piercings may be aspirated or become embedded, requiring surgical removal.

What the report doesn’t go into, though, are concerns of biological, holistic or integrative practitioners over punching through acupuncture points and housing metal in the body. These can block and disturb energy along the meridians, which can damage health over time. You can learn more about the issue in this helpful overview.

Smokers Avoid the Dentist

Not long after we looked at why smokers need to kick their habit before getting treatment for gum disease – a disease that affects tobacco-users disproportionately – the CDC released some new and sad data on smokers, dental problems and dental care.

The CDC looked at 2008 survey responses from more than 16,000 adults ages 18 through 64.

More than a third of smokers reported having three or more dental problems, ranging from stained teeth to jaw pain, toothaches or infected gums. That was more than twice as much as people who never smoked.

But 20 percent of the smokers said they had not been to a dentist in at least five years. Only 10 percent of non-smokers and former smokers had stayed away that long, the study found.

Smokers seem to be aware their dental health is worse “but they’re not doing anything about it,” said Robin Cohen, a CDC statistician who co-authored the new report.

Why not?

Half said they couldn’t afford it, which makes sense: Smoking rates are higher among lower income groups, it’s an expensive habit and the amount and type of damage it causes can quickly inflate a dental bill. I suspect fear plays a role, too – fear of The Lecture, as noted before, and fear of finding out just how bad the problems are.

Unfortunately, the avoidance tactic usually ends up costing much more. According to a study in the Journal of Periodontology, patients with gum disease who did without periodontal treatment could only replace 4 teeth before they were spending more than they would have for a lifetime of periodontal care.

A lifetime!

“Feasible”?

Last, a headline – from a story about recent UK debates on the use of mercury amalgam in dentistry:

Well, amalgam fillings are sure as heck not feasible in any term!

Images by Lottery Monkey, jpmatth and Savannah Roberts, via Flickr

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Gum Disease? Smoker? Why You Need to Kick the Habit Before Getting Treatment

According to a recent poll, 1 in 10 smokers try to hide the fact from their physician. Most say they do this to avoid getting get lectured about their habit. And that’s understandable. After all, most smokers know they should quit. Many have tried. But the pleasures, rituals and effects (physical and mental) – and so, the addiction – often win out.

Since so much of tobacco’s damage isn’t readily visible in a routine medical visit, hiding the habit may be fairly easy – especially if you’re a light smoker, as the poll says many hiders are. Hiding it from a dentist, though, is tougher. Yes, you can mask bad breath for a while. Yes, you can diligently whiten your teeth. But you can’t mask things like bleeding gums, bone and tooth loss or cancerous lesions.

While most Americans have some degree of gum disease, the problem, as noted before, is much worse among smokers. According to research published in the Journal of Periodontology, over half of all cases may be due to smoking, and smokers are four times more likely to develop it. Why? Among other reasons, they “may be more than 10 times more likely than nonsmokers to harbor the bacteria that cause periodontal disease and are also more likely to have advanced periodontal disease.”

And no, it’s not just about cigarettes. You don’t get a free pass just because you smoke cigars or a pipe. The effect is similar. And the more you smoke, the greater the risk. Chewing tobacco carries its own oral health risks.

While gum disease can lead to bone and tooth loss, it’s not a necessary cause. Smoking alone is enough of a trigger, and its effects persist even after decades of living smoke-free. While we can try to spur new bone growth or at least slow the rate of loss, there’s currently no sure-fire fix.

Because of tobacco’s pernicious effects on both the hard and soft oral tissues, an increasing number of periodontists refuse to treat smokers until they kick the habit. Smokers may be surprised, frustrated, hurt or even offended by this. Obviously, they care enough about their oral health to consult with a specialist. But that care needs to motivate a successful quit, as well. After all, would you start repairing a flooded home while water was still gushing in? Or a fire-damaged home while flames are still raging?

For while periodontal treatment may help in the short term, long-term prognosis for smokers is poor. This is borne out both clinically and through research.

Among the latest research is a study just published in the American Journal of Medical Sciences. For it, the authors reviewed over 40 years of research on the impact of smoking on perio surgery outcomes. Of the two dozen studies that met their criteria, 2/3

showed that reductions in probing depth and gains in clinical attachment levels were compromised in smokers in comparison with nonsmokers. Three studies showed residual recession after periodontal surgical interventions to be significantly higher in smokers compared with nonsmokers. Three case reports showed periodontal healing to be uneventful in smokers.

But this can be new incentive to quit. No one wants to waste money on treatments not likely to help much or last long. So the choice becomes one of continued tobacco use and worsening oral health or quitting and getting help to regain periodontal health and keep as many natural teeth as long as possible. (After all, replacing teeth isn’t cheap either: a single implant can cost several thousand dollars!) For the good news is that although the risk of tooth loss persists, the effects of smoking on gum tissue are reversible. You can undo a lot of damage.

You just have to quit the cigs first.

Some natural, drug-free tips for quitting smoking

Abstracts on the tobacco-perio health link

 

Image by Marko Miloševic, via Flickr

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Exercise: Good for Muscles, Heart, Lungs & Yes, Teeth & Gums, Too!

If you’re unfamiliar with holistic approaches to health, you might be surprised by the fact that what’s good for general health is also good for your teeth and gums. Conventional wisdom says dentistry and medicine are two separate fields, not specializations within a single, broad field. So you see a dentist for your teeth and a physician for the rest of your body, as though one had nothing to do with the other.

Funny – how easily we can forget that the mouth is connected with the rest of the body!

Even physical exercise – or the lack of it – affects more that just our muscles, lungs and heart. Those are just the three areas where we feel it most. While we might get a “runner’s high,” we don’t really feel exercise in our brains, even as exercise has been shown to keep the brain fit and improve thinking. Likewise, we don’t feel exercise in our teeth and gums, but there are, in fact, established links between physical fitness and oral health.

For instance, check out the 2005 Journal of Dentistry study, which found that regular exercise lowers the risk of periodontitis (gum disease):

  • Never-smokers who exercised regularly “were about 54% less likely to have periodontitis” than those who didn’t exercise.
  • Former smokers who exercised regularly had a 74% lower risk.

Unsurprisingly, exercise did nothing to lower the risk of gum disease for smokers.

We see similar results when obesity is factored into the equation. For instance, one paper published last year in the Journal of Periodontology found that those with the lowest body mass index (BMI) and highest measure of physical fitness – gauged by percent body fat and maximum oxygen consumption – were less at risk for periodontal disease than other study subjects. “This study suggests,” wrote the research team, “that obesity and physical fitness may have some interactive effect on periodontal health status.”

In fact, there are three positive factors – “health-enhancing behaviors” – that have been shown repeatedly to reduce the risk of gum disease. They’re spelled out in the abstract of one last study I’d like to draw your attention to, also from the Journal of Periodontology:

After controlling for age, gender, race\ethnicity, cigarette smoking, other tobacco products, education, diabetes, poverty index, census region, acculturation, vitamin use, time since the last dental visit, dental calculus, and gingival bleeding, a 1-unit increase in the number of the three health-enhancing behaviors was associated with a 16% reduction in the prevalence of periodontitis (odds ratio [OR] = 0.84; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.77 to 0.93). Individuals who maintained normal weight, engaged in the recommended level of exercise, and had a high-quality diet were 40% less likely to have periodontitis compared to individuals who maintained none of these health-enhancing behaviors. [emphasis added]

So what are you waiting for? Get out there and get moving!

Images by Mait Jüriado and BBluesman, via Flickr

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What’s Ozone Therapy & How Is It Used in Dentistry?

If you’ve read much about “alternative medicine,” you may have run across discussion of something called “ozone therapy.” But what’s that?

The word “ozone” might make you think of pollution. We’ve all heard of the “hole” in the ozone layer caused by CFCs and other toxins. Maybe you’ve read that ozone is found in smog or know a little about its industrial uses, many of which tap into ozone’s disinfecting properties (including use as a pesticide, bacteriacide and fungicide).

Ozone also has a significant history in medical treatment, as well. According to Dr. K.W. Donsback,

Ozone therapy was used medically by Nikola Tesla in 1900. It has been in continual use for over 50 years in Europe and the USA, but due to our legal pressures, ozone is presently only widely used [as an orthodox treatment in Germany, Russia and Cuba]. When the proper protocols are followed, ozone has been proven effective in the treatment and possibly the elimination of over 40 common diseases.

Ozone therapies are among the safest therapies ever used. One European study of over 5.5 million treatments showed a side effect rate of .0007%, probably among the lowest of any therapy known. Side effects (like fever and weakness) are minor and temporary.

Ozone therapy also has a place in dental practice, although its use remains uncommon here in the US, owing to opposition from the dental/medical establishment. Among those dentists who do use it for oral healing and health, there are five main applications :

  1. Ozonated water may be used as a gargle or rinse to treat oral abscesses, gum problems, sore throats and ulcerations. It may also be used for irrigation.
  2. Ozone gas may be used as a preventive measure against tooth decay and periodontal disease.This is done by fitting a custom tray over the patient’s teeth and gums, and letting ozone into the tray for a short while.
  3. Teeth that might otherwise be subject to a root canal or extraction may be treated by washing an exposed nerve first with ozonated water, then with ozone gas.
  4. Ozone may be used as a disinfectant before a root canal or restorative dentistry is done. Ozonated water and gas can get through the walls of the tiny dentinal tubules, killing harmful bacteria that have taken up residence in these hard-to-reach, hard-to-clean places.
  5. Temporomandibular joint pain may be treated with ozone, where gas injected right into the TMJ can kill harmful microbes, as well as reduce inflammation and spur the growth of new cartilage.

Learn more about dental uses of ozone:

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Do Natural Mouthwashes Work?

For most people, antimicrobial mouthwashes – “germ-killing” products such as Listerine – aren’t necessary for good oral hygiene, but they can be helpful. By controlling the growth of S.mutans and other microbes that contribute to oral disease, they can help you keep your gums healthy and get rid of bad breath. But so can effective brushing, flossing and rinsing with plain water.

However, when a person is already showing signs of gingivitis or periodontitis – “gum disease” – their dentist may recommend an antiseptic rinse to help reverse the disease and restore the gums to health.

In this case (as well as after oral surgery), dentists often recommend a solution of the chemical chlorhexidine – the active ingredient in products such as PerioGard, PerioRx and Peridex, which the University of Maryland Medicine Center says “reduces plaque by 55% and gingivitis by 30 – 45%.”

But despite claims to the contrary, one thing chlorhexidine may not do is prevent cavities.

According to a 2008 literature review, research outcomes have been mixed, with insufficient data to support the use of chlorhexidine to prevent cavities.

Since dental caries is a disease with a multifactoral etiology, it is currently more appropriate to use other established, evidence-based prevention methods, such as…diet modifications and good oral hygiene practices. Recent findings also indicate that the effect of an antimicrobial agent for reducing the levels of mutans streptococci or plaque reduction may not always correlate with eventual caries reduction.

Now comes a study which shows chlorhexidine to offer no real improvement over natural antimicrobials when it comes to managing oral biofilms.

For this Journal of Dentistry study, researchers tested the effects of herbal extracts and chitosan on oral biofilms in vitro – that is, outside the human body – using chlorhexidine rinse as a control. The natural antimicrobials

showed immediate killing of oral biofilm bacteria, comparable with chlorhexidine. Moreover, exposure of a biofilm to these supernatants or chlorhexidine, yielded ongoing killing of biofilm bacteria after exposure during re-deposition of bacteria to a matured 16 h biofilm, but not to a much thinner initial biofilm formed by 2 h adhesion only. This suggests that thicker, more matured biofilms can absorb and release oral antimicrobials.

Conclusions: Supernatants based on herbal- and chitosan-based toothpastes have comparable immediate and ongoing antibacterial efficacies as chlorhexidine. Natural antimicrobials and chlorhexidine absorb in oral biofilms which contributes to their substantive action.

Which raises the question: If the effects of natural substances on oral biofilms are at least as good as those of a chemical substance, why opt for the chemical?

Of course, this study doesn’t answer the question of whether this biofilm control actually prevent caries. And so we return to the earlier study and the knowledge that other actions – chiefly good hygiene and diet – are enough. (As I mentioned a couple weeks ago, fluoride as a preventative is questionable at best and, any benefits may not be worth the risks.)

In other words: why make things more complicated than they need to be?

Meantime, if you do like to use a mouthwash – and some do just for the extra fresh and clean feeling it gives – there are excellent natural products available. I prefer Natural Dentist Healthy Gums Mouth Rinse, which contains a blend of cleansing and soothing botanicals including echinacea, golden seal, grapefruit seed, aloe vera gel and calendula. It contains no alcohol, artificial sweeteners, dyes or preservatives, and will not stain the teeth (unlike chlorhexidine rinses).

We have this product available in my Glendale office. According to the manufacturer’s website, it is also available at CVS, the Vitamin Shoppe and Drugstore.com.

Top image by Nicole Lee, via Flickr

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Bleeding Gums Are NOT Normal!

A lot of people think that it’s perfectly normal if their gums bleed a little bit when they brush or floss.

You imagine they’d think so if, say, their scalp bled a little while they washed their hair? Their hands during scrubbing?

Blood is a sign that something is wrong. Bleeding gums are a sign of disease. If left untreated, the result is lost bone and, ultimately, lost teeth.

 

 

But it’s not just the mouth that suffers. Periodontal (gum) disease has been linked with many other inflammatory conditions, including heart disease, diabetes and stroke. For what happens in the mouth can and does affect the rest of the body. How could it be otherwise? Your mouth is connected to your body; your body is connected to your mouth.

Whoopi Goldberg, for one, found out about the oral/systemic link the hard way – and spoke of it quite powerfully on The View:

 

 

If you’re not taking care of your mouth, you’re not taking care of your body!

That’s plain, hard truth; wisdom that comes from, as Whoopi says, “paying the price” for neglecting her oral health for so long (and this despite the fact that she had insurance and far more than enough money to get regular, top-notch care).

Indeed, no one is immune from gum disease, though some are more susceptible than others. (Click here for a list of contributing factors.) Still, there are three important things we can do to lower our risk: 1) Don’t use tobacco; 2) Brush, floss and see your dentist regularly; and 3) Eat well, including lots of fresh vegetables and few sugary drinks and highly processed carbs.

Want to learn more about the connections between periodontal disease and systemic health? I recommend ZT4BG – Zero Tolerance for Bleeding Gums – a site maintained by dentist William C. Domb, DMD.

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