Category Archives: Video

Dr. David Kennedy’s Fluoridegate

A new documentary well worth your time and attention, from one of America’s leading experts on fluoride and fluoridation:

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The Future of Food

Heading toward next week’s election and the vote on GMO labeling here in California, a documentary worth watching again:

Previously

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Oral Health, Systemic Health: The Connection

A wonderful video by English dentist and naturopath Dr. Alison Adams on the basics of biological dental medicine:

The whole playlist this comes from – Root Canals & Infection – is excellent, giving a good overview of many important concerns in biological dentistry. Topics include mercury and other heavy metal toxicity, cavitations, fluoride, oral galvanism and more. Check it out!

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About All That Sugar…

 

You can read Dr. Lustig’s important paper “The Toxic Truth about Sugar” here.

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Understanding Fluoridation

Watch the rest of the interview here

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Beyond “Just” Dentistry

It’s funny how people tend to make a distinction between dentists and “regular doctors.” Physicians are, by and large, all considered doctors even if they specialize in some isolated body part – ophthalmologists for eyes, say, or dermatologists for skin, podiatrists for feet – except for the mouth. When you do that, you’re not a doctor but a dentist.

Yet what is a dentist but a physician who specializes in the mouth, teeth and other oral structures?

Currently, 9 dental specializations are officially recognized:

  1. Dental public health, which focuses on dental epidemiology and public health policy
  2. Endodontics, which focuses on the inside of the tooth, or dental pulp (If you’ve ever had a root canal, you may have been referred to an endodontist – a dentist who specializes in this procedure .)
  3. Oral and maxillofacial pathology, which is concerned with diseases of the mouth and jaw
  4. Oral and maxillofacial radiology, which is concerned with x-ray and other imaging of mouth and jaw diseases and conditions
  5. Oral and maxillofacial surgery, which treats diseases, injuries and defects of the mouth and jaw
  6. Orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics, which focuses on tooth and jaw alignment
  7. Pediatric dentistry, which focuses on the dental health of children
  8. Periodontics, which is concerned with the health and treatment of the gums and related oral structures
  9. Prosthodontics, which involves the replacement of missing teeth

And biological dentistry?

Even as more dentists are pursuing the extra education and training to specialize in biological dental medicine, it remains an unofficial specialty. But considering our ever-deepening understanding of the oral-systemic health connection, its a specialty on the leading edge.

This is because biological dentistry is most intently concerned with that connection. Sometimes called “holistic,” “whole-body” or “integrative” dentistry, it combines the best clinical practices of Western dentistry with the wisdom of other traditions, including Traditional Chinese Medicine. Knowing that local causes can have distant effects, the biological dentist always keeps the big picture in mind: the effect of dental conditions and treatment on the body, and vice versa. Thus, issues of biocompatibility loom large. So, too, issues of toxins such as mercury and fluoride: Their effects go far beyond the teeth.

Acknowledging that treating symptoms is not the same as treating – let alone preventing – disease, biological dentistry prefers therapies that support the body’s self-healing abilities. It favors nontoxic, nature-based remedies and a conservative approach to treating the teeth. As one colleague of mine likes to say, “The best dentistry is the least dentistry.”

Operatory image by Dr. Alper, via Flickr

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Making Sense of Mercury

…with a much needed dose of humor, to boot!

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Mindful Eating, Healthier Eating

 

Of course, in general, mindfulness can play a big role in health and healing – the subject of this excellent talk by Jon Kabat-Zinn.

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The Healing Potential of Diet

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Not Sleeping Well? Could Be You’re Bruxing

Today, we usually think of clenching and grinding teeth as a sign of stress or anger. And it often is. Consequently, we’ve seen quite a rise in this behavior since the onset of economic turmoil in 2008. But the phenomenon itself isn’t new at all. Our ancient ancestors did it, too, with the earliest records of it – via clay tablets found in the Mesopotamian Basin – dating back to about 3000 BC. Our modern word for the habit – bruxism – comes from the other side of the Mediterranean, though: from the Greek word ebruxya, which literally means “to gnash the teeth.”

Though statistics remain a little sketchy, estimates say about 5 to 20% of us are bruxers, with the higher number likely being closer to right. The habit is especially common during sleep. In fact, it’s the third most common sleep disorder after insomnia and snoring.

What’s more, those with another sleep disorder are more apt to be bruxers, too. Other risk factors include smoking, high caffeine intake, high alcohol intake, medication use and, of course, stress. But because bruxism is a habit, it can – and usually does – continue even after its cause has been dealt with. Among the problems it can lead to:

  • Poor quality sleep
  • Worn down teeth and fillings or other restorations
  • Fractured teeth
  • Inflammation and receding gums
  • Loose teeth and premature tooth loss
  • Persistent headaches and chronic jaw, face, neck and head pain
  • TMJ disorder

TMJ stands for temporomandibular joint, and you have one on each side of your head. Together, they’re the hinge that lets you open and close your mouth – something than can be hard or painful to do if the joints are damaged or dysfunctional. (To see why this may be so, check out these videos showing what both healthy and dysfunctional TM joints look like in action.) You may experience clicking, grinding or pain in your jaw joints, or ringing or buzzing in your ears. “When the joint puts pressure on the nerves, muscles and blood vessels that pass near the head,” says Dr. Nigel Carter of the British Dental Health Foundation, “it can often result in headaches and migraines.”

Even so, adds Dr. Carter,

The cause of your headaches could actually be the way your teeth meet when your jaws bite together, otherwise known as dental occlusion. If you do suffer from continual headaches or migraines, especially first thing in the morning, pain behind your eyes, sinus pains and pains in the neck or shoulders, you should consider visiting your dentist, as well as a doctor, as soon as possible.

To check my patients’ occlusion, I use an imaging system called Tek-Scan, which shows how the teeth come together. It lets us see places where your bite may be “off” or where there’s an imbalance of force when you close your jaw. Once we’ve found these imbalances, we can determine the best solutions for correcting them.

For TMJ issues, we have another diagnostic tool: BioJVA (joint vibrational analysis). BioJVA lets us take fast, non-invasive and repeatable measurements of your TMJ function by determining the amount and kind of vibration at the joints. With it, we can diagnose dysfunction more specifically, and, because it’s repeatable, we can easily measure your progress through treatment.

Splint therapy is one of the most common and conservative measures taken to bring relief and readjust the jaw and related musculature. You may have seen or heard of over-the-counter “night guards” meant to cushion the forces of clenching and grinding, the main virtue of which is their low cost. Unfortunately, they’re often of little help to serious bruxers, who pretty quickly grind right through them. Their fit can often be poor, as well, causing problems such as discomfort, damaged gums or increased clenching.

A custom splint, on the other hand, will fit your mouth precisely and will normally last much, much longer than an over-the-counter device. Here’s what one of my patients had to say after just the first week of wearing a night guard we provided him:

But wait, you say. If I’m sleeping, how can I know if I’m grinding my teeth? Here are a few questions to ask yourself:

  • Are your jaw muscles or neck achy when you wake up?
  • Is it hard to open your mouth first thing in the morning?
  • Do the biting surfaces of your teeth look worn down?
  • Do you have frequent headaches?
  • Has your bed partner ever complained about you making grinding noises while you sleep or told you about any mouth movements he or she has seen you make while sleeping?

As is the way with such questionnaires, the more “yesses,” the more likely it is that bruxing is an issue for you, in which case you should consult your dentist for help with remedies and relief…and a better night’s sleep.

Image by justin, via Flickr

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